International Language Web Sites

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International Language Web Sites

Hoard, Brent

We are exploring resources for constructing international student recruitment sites written in languages other than English.  Have any of you used external translation and/or copywriting services to generate content for international language sites for your institutions?  We’d appreciate your insights and recommendations, if so.

 

Thank you,

-Brent

 

------------------------
Brent Hoard, Ph.D.
Director of Web Services, Randolph-Macon College
Ashland, Virginia
804.752.3058
[hidden email]

http://www.rmc.edu

 

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Re: International Language Web Sites

Helen Jones-Toms
We use a service called Keystone Solutions...that translates the site in 40 languages and deals with international SEO issues.
We get good traffic from the site but we haven't converted any into matriculated students yet. 

Look at masterstudies.com.  
 

On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Hoard, Brent <[hidden email]> wrote:

We are exploring resources for constructing international student recruitment sites written in languages other than English.  Have any of you used external translation and/or copywriting services to generate content for international language sites for your institutions?  We’d appreciate your insights and recommendations, if so.

 

Thank you,

-Brent

 

------------------------
Brent Hoard, Ph.D.
Director of Web Services, Randolph-Macon College
Ashland, Virginia
<a href="tel:(804)%20752-3058" value="+18047523058" target="_blank">804.752.3058
[hidden email]

http://www.rmc.edu

 

Connect with R-MC!

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--
Helen Jones-Toms, MNO
Director of Marketing & Communications
Frances Payne Bolton School of Nursing
Case Western Reserve University
office: 216-368-6988
cell: 216-337-0888
Twitter: @fpbnursing



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Re: International Language Web Sites

Ryan LeBreton
In reply to this post by Hoard, Brent
We partnered with a company called TransPerfect to create selected Admissions pages in Spanish and Chinese. I wasn't involved in the vendor selection process and I don't have access to contract details, but working with them has been fairly painless. We started by identifying a series of pages we needed to have translated, and sent the vendor raw html in a zip archive, which they translated and sent back. We identified a number of native language speakers on campus to vet the copy, and sent the vendor any concerns. Once we had the final copy back from them, we created pages in a staging area and shared a link with them for final review. 

The results can be found in the navigation on this page: http://www.bucknell.edu/admissions/international-admissions.html

The work was only just completed, so we don't have any metrics or measurement of success at this point. Unfortunately the project lead on this initiative has moved on, but I'm happy to try to answer any questions. 

Thanks,
Ryan



Ryan LeBreton
Senior Associate Director of Digital Communications
Division of Communications
Bucknell University
p:570.577.3122
w:www.bucknell.edu  e: [hidden email]

On Fri, Jul 14, 2017 at 11:52 AM, Hoard, Brent <[hidden email]> wrote:

We are exploring resources for constructing international student recruitment sites written in languages other than English.  Have any of you used external translation and/or copywriting services to generate content for international language sites for your institutions?  We’d appreciate your insights and recommendations, if so.

 

Thank you,

-Brent

 

------------------------
Brent Hoard, Ph.D.
Director of Web Services, Randolph-Macon College
Ashland, Virginia
<a href="tel:(804)%20752-3058" value="+18047523058" target="_blank">804.752.3058
[hidden email]

http://www.rmc.edu

 

Connect with R-MC!

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To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Angela French
In reply to this post by Hoard, Brent

I saw a demo of MotionPoint years ago that was very impressive.  My employer at the time didn’t have the financial resources to go this route however.

 

https://www.motionpoint.com/

 

Angela French

 

From: Hoard, Brent [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 8:53 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] International Language Web Sites

 

We are exploring resources for constructing international student recruitment sites written in languages other than English.  Have any of you used external translation and/or copywriting services to generate content for international language sites for your institutions?  We’d appreciate your insights and recommendations, if so.

 

Thank you,

-Brent

 

------------------------
Brent Hoard, Ph.D.
Director of Web Services, Randolph-Macon College
Ashland, Virginia
804.752.3058
[hidden email]

http://www.rmc.edu

 

Connect with R-MC!

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You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Harwood, Catherine
In reply to this post by Hoard, Brent

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 

From: Hoard, Brent [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Friday, July 14, 2017 11:53 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] International Language Web Sites

 

We are exploring resources for constructing international student recruitment sites written in languages other than English.  Have any of you used external translation and/or copywriting services to generate content for international language sites for your institutions?  We’d appreciate your insights and recommendations, if so.

 

Thank you,

-Brent

 

------------------------
Brent Hoard, Ph.D.
Director of Web Services, Randolph-Macon College
Ashland, Virginia
804.752.3058
[hidden email]

http://www.rmc.edu

 

Connect with R-MC!

Description: Facebook  Description: youtube  Description: Twitter  Description: LinkedIn  Description: flickr-02

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Angela Burrell-2

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

O'Neill, Michael J

> just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your

> international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting

> your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real

> translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content

> they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers

> at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them

> away!

 

This.  So much this. 

 

One follow on question is: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text, is Google Translate better than nothing, or is nothing better than Google Translate?

 

-Michael

 

Michael J. O’Neill

Web Content Strategist — Collegiate Marketing Team

 

The University of Iowa

Tippie College of Business

108 John Pappajohn Business Bldg, Ste. W230A

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1994

319-353-4531 | [hidden email]

 

From: Angela Burrell [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:04 AM
To: '[hidden email]' <[hidden email]>
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Rosenberger, Luke E

Perhaps a related question: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text on your website for a certain language, do you in fact have the budget or capacity to provide good customer experience for a speaker of that language elsewhere in your business processes (beyond your website)?

 

In other words, are speakers of that language really part of your target audience or not?

 

Luke

 

From: O'Neill, Michael J [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:15 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

> just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your

> international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting

> your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real

> translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content

> they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers

> at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them

> away!

 

This.  So much this. 

 

One follow on question is: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text, is Google Translate better than nothing, or is nothing better than Google Translate?

 

-Michael

 

Michael J. O’Neill

Web Content Strategist — Collegiate Marketing Team

 

The University of Iowa

Tippie College of Business

108 John Pappajohn Business Bldg, Ste. W230A

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1994

319-353-4531 | [hidden email]

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:04 AM
To: '[hidden email]' <[hidden email]>
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Bond, Dennis
In reply to this post by O'Neill, Michael J

When you consider that the location of a translate feature like Google Translate is not a standard convention and that international viewers are likely going to have their own methods of translating an English page if need be, it would seem to be a useless gesture at best. Would you be able to find a translation feature on a website that was in a language you don’t speak?

 

Dennis Bond

Manager of Web Services

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Michigan State University

(517) 884-4898

[hidden email]

 

From: O'Neill, Michael J [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 9:15 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

> just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your

> international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting

> your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real

> translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content

> they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers

> at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them

> away!

 

This.  So much this. 

 

One follow on question is: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text, is Google Translate better than nothing, or is nothing better than Google Translate?

 

-Michael

 

Michael J. O’Neill

Web Content Strategist — Collegiate Marketing Team

 

The University of Iowa

Tippie College of Business

108 John Pappajohn Business Bldg, Ste. W230A

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1994

319-353-4531 | [hidden email]

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:04 AM
To: '[hidden email]' <[hidden email]>
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Angela Burrell-2
In reply to this post by Rosenberger, Luke E

In my opinion, “nothing” is a better option than Google Translate. J

 

For Luke’s question, although I think it’s important to budget for website translations if you are recruiting in a specific country or language group, it might not always translate (no pun intended) to on-site customer service.

 

in our specific case, we explain (in the prospective student’s native language, if possible) what our ESL requirements are and how to meet them. Students do understand that they must understand a certain level of English in order to attend our school. If they fall below the requirement they must take an on-site ESL program (and attain a specific ESL score) before they can be admitted to their desired program.

 

Additionally, we realize that the person visiting our website might not be the actual student – it might be a parent or an agent, who does not need to understand English necessarily but might still like to learn about our institution, programs, cost, and requirements.

 

I should also note that I think some of our translations were actually done by in-house staff members (native speakers) – I am not sure if they sent out for some of the translations or to have them double-checked. If in-house translations are a possibility then it could certainly save some money.

 

So basically, each school needs to decide if the budget to translate content to recruit these tuition-paying students is worth the investment.

 

--Angela

 

From: Rosenberger, Luke E [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: July 26, 2017 9:22 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Perhaps a related question: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text on your website for a certain language, do you in fact have the budget or capacity to provide good customer experience for a speaker of that language elsewhere in your business processes (beyond your website)?

 

In other words, are speakers of that language really part of your target audience or not?

 

Luke

 

From: O'Neill, Michael J [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:15 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

> just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your

> international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting

> your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real

> translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content

> they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers

> at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them

> away!

 

This.  So much this. 

 

One follow on question is: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text, is Google Translate better than nothing, or is nothing better than Google Translate?

 

-Michael

 

Michael J. O’Neill

Web Content Strategist — Collegiate Marketing Team

 

The University of Iowa

Tippie College of Business

108 John Pappajohn Business Bldg, Ste. W230A

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1994

319-353-4531 | [hidden email]

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:04 AM
To: '[hidden email]' <[hidden email]>
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: International Language Web Sites

Rosenberger, Luke E

Thanks, I appreciate you sharing your thought process on that.

 

Sounds like you’re clearly thinking through the non-English-speaking user’s experience, and focusing your translation effort on specific content that needs to be in another language (i.e. explaining ESL requirements, or content that might be of value to parents or agents), instead of taking a scattershot/blanket approach and trying to translate everything on the site.

 

I think that’s an important element of the decisionmaking as well – audit your content, analyze the journey/pathways of non-English-speaking users on your site, and target your translations.

 

Luke

 

From: Angela Burrell [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:50 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

In my opinion, “nothing” is a better option than Google Translate. J

 

For Luke’s question, although I think it’s important to budget for website translations if you are recruiting in a specific country or language group, it might not always translate (no pun intended) to on-site customer service.

 

in our specific case, we explain (in the prospective student’s native language, if possible) what our ESL requirements are and how to meet them. Students do understand that they must understand a certain level of English in order to attend our school. If they fall below the requirement they must take an on-site ESL program (and attain a specific ESL score) before they can be admitted to their desired program.

 

Additionally, we realize that the person visiting our website might not be the actual student – it might be a parent or an agent, who does not need to understand English necessarily but might still like to learn about our institution, programs, cost, and requirements.

 

I should also note that I think some of our translations were actually done by in-house staff members (native speakers) – I am not sure if they sent out for some of the translations or to have them double-checked. If in-house translations are a possibility then it could certainly save some money.

 

So basically, each school needs to decide if the budget to translate content to recruit these tuition-paying students is worth the investment.

 

--Angela

 

From: Rosenberger, Luke E [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 26, 2017 9:22 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Perhaps a related question: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text on your website for a certain language, do you in fact have the budget or capacity to provide good customer experience for a speaker of that language elsewhere in your business processes (beyond your website)?

 

In other words, are speakers of that language really part of your target audience or not?

 

Luke

 

From: O'Neill, Michael J [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:15 AM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

> just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your

> international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting

> your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real

> translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content

> they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers

> at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them

> away!

 

This.  So much this. 

 

One follow on question is: if you don’t have the budget or capability to have human-translated text, is Google Translate better than nothing, or is nothing better than Google Translate?

 

-Michael

 

Michael J. O’Neill

Web Content Strategist — Collegiate Marketing Team

 

The University of Iowa

Tippie College of Business

108 John Pappajohn Business Bldg, Ste. W230A

Iowa City, Iowa 52242-1994

319-353-4531 | [hidden email]

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Wednesday, July 26, 2017 8:04 AM
To: '[hidden email]' <[hidden email]>
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

Our international department has a multi-language recruiting website. During design, they tested Google translate, and the quality of the translations was poor enough that it would reflect badly on our school. The department opted to use only human translations instead.

 

My personal opinion is that just having the Google translate button is a strong message to your international users that although you acknowledge they are visiting your page, you don’t care enough to provide them with a real translation, and you don’t care about providing them quality content they can understand. They are not going to feel like valued customers at all. It might even reflect negatively on your school and drive them away!

 

I think it would be best to either provide human-translated material, or just not have any translations at all, so they can use their own tool if needed.

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

 

From: Harwood, Catherine [[hidden email]]
Sent: July 24, 2017 6:04 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] RE: International Language Web Sites

 

I am curious whether anyone has been asked to “just put the Google translate widget” on a page to translate it into other languages? We were asked to test that option and the translation quality is questionable – and we don’t see how that’s any different than someone who arrives on Google Chrome just using the browser’s built  in version of Translate. Plus it of course puts a google branded button in the upper left of the page.

 

Anyone asked to do something similar with thoughts to share?

 

Catherine Harwood

Eastern Florida State College

Manager, Web and Social Media

321-433-5931 (Office)

harwoodc@...

 



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