Style Question -- Colorblind

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Style Question -- Colorblind

Bruce Harper
On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

Thanks for any hints or tips.

Bruce in Blacksburg
Virginia Tech Webmaster



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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Bond, Dennis

My suggestion would be to underline the links for sure. If you don’t, you’ll need to some up with something else recognizable other than the color in order to meet WCAG 2.0 1.4.1 (https://www.w3.org/TR/UNDERSTANDING-WCAG20/visual-audio-contrast-without-color.html). Since underlined links are already a well-established convention, it seems like a good solution. This is also what WCAG suggests you do in tactic G182: https://www.w3.org/TR/2016/NOTE-WCAG20-TECHS-20160317/G182. This would also make your links more readable on mobile, where there is no hover.

 

I hope that helps!

 

Dennis Bond

Manager of Web Services

College of Agriculture and Natural Resources

Michigan State University

(517) 884-4898

[hidden email]

 

From: Bruce Harper [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Angela Burrell-2
In reply to this post by Bruce Harper

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Angela French

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Angela French

I found this one:  http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

 

From: Angela French [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Jeffrey Butera
To state the obvious which is not related to URLs...

If you have a custom application in which you use icons for displaying something such as a status, you need to ensure the icons have different image as well as color to convey their meaning.  Having the same image in different colors (eg: red/green) is a no-go.

Jeff


 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 


-- 
Jeffrey Butera, PhD
Associate Director for Application and Web Services
Information Technology
Hampshire College
413-559-5556


You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Hank Wells
In reply to this post by Angela French

On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 3:50 PM, Angela French <[hidden email]> wrote:

I found this one:  http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

 

From: Angela French [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM


To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot








--
Hank Wells

_______________________


Direct: 678 242 1406
Mobile: 404 860 0402

www.studentbridge.com




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To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Anderson, Will
In reply to this post by Angela French

I can’t vouch for these, but it seems like a pretty good list:

http://www.webaxe.org/color-contrast-tools/

 

 

From: Angela French [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 2:50 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

I found this one:  http://colorfilter.wickline.org/

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Brian Gallagher
In reply to this post by Angela Burrell-2
You could also try using a style of Underline for links and dotted/dashed underlines for visited links if you want a non-color-only way of showing the difference.


On Mon, Aug 29, 2016 at 3:04 PM, Angela Burrell <[hidden email]> wrote:

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot








--
Brian Gallagher - Diamondsea.com / VirtCert.com - 800-604-1476
[hidden email] - 888-411-8144 Fax - www.DiamondSea.com


You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Rich Paul
In reply to this post by Angela French

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

 

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Angela French

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Gramke, Jim
In reply to this post by Rich Paul

Unsubscribe

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 2:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

 

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Greg Gamble

To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot

 

 

Greg Gamble
SBCTC - Olympia | Information Services
p - 360-704-4376
P think before printing

 

From: Gramke, Jim [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 1:22 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Unsubscribe

 

From: Rich Paul [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 2:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

 

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Adrian J Cooke
In reply to this post by Angela French

 

Hi Angela,

 

Returning to an old thread in case it’s still useful (though others might have mentioned this before)…

 

Color Oracle ( http://www.colororacle.org ) is a system utility that will change the tint of your display to simulate three different kinds of color impairment. It doesn’t produce a report. It simply enables you to subjectively compare your site’s color contrasts the way someone with these conditions might. There are some resources linked on the site too.

 

Not sure if it’s the tool you need, but figured list members might find it helpful.

 

Regards,

Adrian

 

 

Adrian Cooke | Senior Web Information Architect

Marketing and Communications / Online Platforms
Rm 1-205 | 111 College Place
Syracuse, New York 13244

m 315.412.8188  e [hidden email]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

 

 

From: Angela French <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 4:03 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Adam Norwood

Alas, Color Oracle hasn’t been updated in about four years and it no longer works on newer versions of OS X (at least for me) — it was always my favorite color blindness simulator otherwise!

 

Here’s a different web-based tool that Christopher Schmitt has been working on that’s pretty useful: http://colorfuzz.com/ I appreciate that you can continue to scroll and interact with the site without the simulation going away, one of the limitations that many of the other tools have. Downsides to ColorFuzz: your site has to allow iframes (many are now blocking 3rd party iframing for security reasons), and it won’t help you with non-web design applications like Photoshop.

 

Happy color testing,

Adam

 

 

--

Adam Norwood

Senior Web Strategist / Developer

The University of Texas School of Law

(512) 471-3040    Twitter: @anorwood

 

From: Adrian J Cooke <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 12:42 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

 

Hi Angela,

 

Returning to an old thread in case it’s still useful (though others might have mentioned this before)…

 

Color Oracle ( http://www.colororacle.org ) is a system utility that will change the tint of your display to simulate three different kinds of color impairment. It doesn’t produce a report. It simply enables you to subjectively compare your site’s color contrasts the way someone with these conditions might. There are some resources linked on the site too.

 

Not sure if it’s the tool you need, but figured list members might find it helpful.

 

Regards,

Adrian

 

 

Adrian Cooke | Senior Web Information Architect

Marketing and Communications / Online Platforms
Rm 1-205 | 111 College Place
Syracuse, New York 13244

m 315.412.8188  e [hidden email]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

 

 

From: Angela French <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 4:03 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Jennifer Loudiana
And you can try to run all you want on Windows 7 but it won't do anything :-(

On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 2:14 PM, Adam Norwood <[hidden email]> wrote:

Alas, Color Oracle hasn’t been updated in about four years and it no longer works on newer versions of OS X (at least for me) — it was always my favorite color blindness simulator otherwise!

 

Here’s a different web-based tool that Christopher Schmitt has been working on that’s pretty useful: http://colorfuzz.com/ I appreciate that you can continue to scroll and interact with the site without the simulation going away, one of the limitations that many of the other tools have. Downsides to ColorFuzz: your site has to allow iframes (many are now blocking 3rd party iframing for security reasons), and it won’t help you with non-web design applications like Photoshop.

 

Happy color testing,

Adam

 

 

--

Adam Norwood

Senior Web Strategist / Developer

The University of Texas School of Law

<a href="tel:%28512%29%20471-3040" target="_blank" value="+15124713040">(512) 471-3040    Twitter: @anorwood

 

From: Adrian J Cooke <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 12:42 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

 

Hi Angela,

 

Returning to an old thread in case it’s still useful (though others might have mentioned this before)…

 

Color Oracle ( http://www.colororacle.org ) is a system utility that will change the tint of your display to simulate three different kinds of color impairment. It doesn’t produce a report. It simply enables you to subjectively compare your site’s color contrasts the way someone with these conditions might. There are some resources linked on the site too.

 

Not sure if it’s the tool you need, but figured list members might find it helpful.

 

Regards,

Adrian

 

 

Adrian Cooke | Senior Web Information Architect

Marketing and Communications / Online Platforms
Rm 1-205 | 111 College Place
Syracuse, New York 13244

m <a href="tel:315.412.8188" target="_blank" value="+13154128188">315.412.8188  e [hidden email]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

 

 

From: Angela French <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 4:03 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
<a href="tel:805.484.9400%2C%20ext.%20231" target="_blank" value="+18054849400">805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot








You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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Re: Style Question -- Colorblind

Julia Gray
It took me three browsers for it work, but it did finally work for me using Chrome (and not in IE or Firefox).

YMMV depending on your setup

-Julia

On 10/20/2016 1:23 PM, Jennifer Loudiana wrote:
And you can try to run all you want on Windows 7 but it won't do anything :-(

On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 2:14 PM, Adam Norwood <[hidden email]> wrote:

Alas, Color Oracle hasn’t been updated in about four years and it no longer works on newer versions of OS X (at least for me) — it was always my favorite color blindness simulator otherwise!

 

Here’s a different web-based tool that Christopher Schmitt has been working on that’s pretty useful: http://colorfuzz.com/ I appreciate that you can continue to scroll and interact with the site without the simulation going away, one of the limitations that many of the other tools have. Downsides to ColorFuzz: your site has to allow iframes (many are now blocking 3rd party iframing for security reasons), and it won’t help you with non-web design applications like Photoshop.

 

Happy color testing,

Adam

 

 

--

Adam Norwood

Senior Web Strategist / Developer

The University of Texas School of Law

<a moz-do-not-send="true" href="tel:%28512%29%20471-3040" target="_blank" value="+15124713040">(512) 471-3040    Twitter: @anorwood

 

From: Adrian J Cooke <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 12:42 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

 

Hi Angela,

 

Returning to an old thread in case it’s still useful (though others might have mentioned this before)…

 

Color Oracle ( http://www.colororacle.org ) is a system utility that will change the tint of your display to simulate three different kinds of color impairment. It doesn’t produce a report. It simply enables you to subjectively compare your site’s color contrasts the way someone with these conditions might. There are some resources linked on the site too.

 

Not sure if it’s the tool you need, but figured list members might find it helpful.

 

Regards,

Adrian

 

 

Adrian Cooke | Senior Web Information Architect

Marketing and Communications / Online Platforms
Rm 1-205 | 111 College Place
Syracuse, New York 13244

m <a moz-do-not-send="true" href="tel:315.412.8188" target="_blank" value="+13154128188">315.412.8188  e [hidden email]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

 

 

From: Angela French <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 4:03 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
<a moz-do-not-send="true" href="tel:805.484.9400%2C%20ext.%20231" target="_blank" value="+18054849400">805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot









You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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3rd party vendors for creating college / course catalog

Tepfer, Seth
In reply to this post by Adrian J Cooke

We are looking at 3rd party vendors who might implement our college catalog. We currently have it in both HTML and PDF formats. 


For those that used 3rd party vendors in implementing your catalog:

- what was the implementation experience like? How long did it take?

- would you use that vendor again, if you were to do it all over again?

- What features and functionality would you say was required, and what was optional?

- Who does the maintenance - EG, are the updates to the catalog done by the Academic office functionals or by folks in  the web team?

- are you able to easily generate PDFs of the catalog?

- how expensive is this?


This question came up a year ago (thanks, Chris Tetta), and I'd like to ask it again to see if there are new vendors, experiences, or comments.


If anyone would be interested in talking off line about the implementation experience, I'd love to hear extended details. 


Thanks


Seth Tepfer
Director of Administrative Computing
Oxford College
770-784-8487
[hidden email]

Use AskIT for fastest response: Oxford.emory.edu/AskIT


 




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Re: 3rd party vendors for creating college / course catalog

Gregg Banse
I've worked with Courseleaf (by Leepfrog) indirectly as a web administrator and marketer. Great product. Berkeley's catalog is Courseleaf. http://guide.berkeley.edu

Gregg

Sent from OWA on Android
From: Tepfer, Seth <[hidden email]>
Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2016 2:33:31 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] 3rd party vendors for creating college / course catalog
 

We are looking at 3rd party vendors who might implement our college catalog. We currently have it in both HTML and PDF formats. 


For those that used 3rd party vendors in implementing your catalog:

- what was the implementation experience like? How long did it take?

- would you use that vendor again, if you were to do it all over again?

- What features and functionality would you say was required, and what was optional?

- Who does the maintenance - EG, are the updates to the catalog done by the Academic office functionals or by folks in  the web team?

- are you able to easily generate PDFs of the catalog?

- how expensive is this?


This question came up a year ago (thanks, Chris Tetta), and I'd like to ask it again to see if there are new vendors, experiences, or comments.


If anyone would be interested in talking off line about the implementation experience, I'd love to hear extended details. 


Thanks


Seth Tepfer
Director of Administrative Computing
Oxford College
770-784-8487
[hidden email]

Use AskIT for fastest response: Oxford.emory.edu/AskIT


 




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RE: Style Question -- Colorblind

Sorensen, Jeffrey T [ITUIS]
In reply to this post by Adam Norwood

I really like ColorFuzz. My only complaint is that the control is an overlay that often blocks the thing I am trying to examine more closely. I wish it were movable, collapsible, or would downshift the content.

 

Jeff Sorensen

______________________________________________

Web Development Services

IT Services, Iowa State University

515-294-6654 / www.it.iastate.edu

 

From: Adam Norwood [mailto:[hidden email]]
Sent: Thursday, October 20, 2016 1:15 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: Re: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Alas, Color Oracle hasn’t been updated in about four years and it no longer works on newer versions of OS X (at least for me) — it was always my favorite color blindness simulator otherwise!

 

Here’s a different web-based tool that Christopher Schmitt has been working on that’s pretty useful: http://colorfuzz.com/ I appreciate that you can continue to scroll and interact with the site without the simulation going away, one of the limitations that many of the other tools have. Downsides to ColorFuzz: your site has to allow iframes (many are now blocking 3rd party iframing for security reasons), and it won’t help you with non-web design applications like Photoshop.

 

Happy color testing,

Adam

 

 

--

Adam Norwood

Senior Web Strategist / Developer

The University of Texas School of Law

(512) 471-3040    Twitter: @anorwood

 

From: Adrian J Cooke <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Thursday, October 20, 2016 at 12:42 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: Re: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

 

Hi Angela,

 

Returning to an old thread in case it’s still useful (though others might have mentioned this before)…

 

Color Oracle ( http://www.colororacle.org ) is a system utility that will change the tint of your display to simulate three different kinds of color impairment. It doesn’t produce a report. It simply enables you to subjectively compare your site’s color contrasts the way someone with these conditions might. There are some resources linked on the site too.

 

Not sure if it’s the tool you need, but figured list members might find it helpful.

 

Regards,

Adrian

 

 

Adrian Cooke | Senior Web Information Architect

Marketing and Communications / Online Platforms
Rm 1-205 | 111 College Place
Syracuse, New York 13244

m 315.412.8188  e [hidden email]

SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

 

 

From: Angela French <[hidden email]>
Reply-To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Date: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 at 4:03 PM
To: "[hidden email]" <[hidden email]>
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Yes it is.  I was looking for one that shows what one’s pages look for different types of colorblindness though.

 

From: Rich Paul [[hidden email]]
Sent: Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:43 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Hi Angela,

 

http://achecker.ca/ is a good accessibility checker

 

                                                                                                                               

Rich Paul
Technical Product Specialist

OmniUpdate
805.484.9400, ext. 231
omniupdate.com

 

 

From: Angela French [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:40 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

Is there an evaluator on line into which one can submit a page URL for an evaluation?

 

Angela French

SBCTC.edu

 

From: Angela Burrell [[hidden email]]
Sent: Monday, August 29, 2016 12:05 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: RE: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

It is actually a WCAG level-A requirement to have your links underlined (or otherwise distinguishable without colour vision) for this very reason. Then it doesn’t really matter what colour you choose for your links, users will still be able to distinguish them.

 

https://www.w3.org/TR/WCAG20-TECHS/F73.html

 

Hope this helps!

 

 

Angela Burrell

Web Developer

Information Technology

Lambton College

Sarnia, Ontario

 

 

From: Bruce Harper [[hidden email]]
Sent: August 29, 2016 2:51 PM
To: [hidden email]
Subject: [uwebd] Style Question -- Colorblind

 

On a number of pages maintained by the department served out of the new CMS, links are our school-color maroon (#660000), which changes to a blue (#337ab7) underlined link when moused over. The issue is that someone who is colorblind can't differentiate between the normal text color and link color, so he has no way to know what are links on a page. On a mobile device, there is the same behavior, except the link changes color when it is touched/clicked-on.

 

Has anyone else had to design for this problem? One suggestion is to offer advice on how to set up a user style sheet or install an extension (Google offers Color Enhancer for Chrome). Another suggestion is to just underline all the links across the board to make them visible to everyone.

 

Are there other ways to handle this? Any particular sites that do this well, when colors fall into ranges that affect those with colorblindness? One issue that is mentioned in the comments about the Color Enhancer is that it didn't do much for those who had more than red/green colorblindness.

 

Thanks for any hints or tips.

 

Bruce in Blacksburg

Virginia Tech Webmaster

 



You are currently subscribed to [hidden email].
To unsubscribe send an email to [hidden email] with the subject line unsubscribe uwebd. Leave the message body blank. If you experience problems, contact list owner Eric Kreider at [hidden email]. More information is available at: http://www.uakron.edu/webteam/university-web-developers.dot




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